The Reformation and the Opening of the Book (Part 1)

Here begins the first of, let’s hope, two posts regarding the designs, on the page and the reader, of title pages issued in the Reformation. In this post, I examine the opening pages of books in the later medieval period and the turn of the sixteenth century, concluding with a brief discussion of a volume by Martin Luther published in the 1520. Prior to the last decades of the fifteenth century, medieval openers of bound bibles–whether written by hand or printed with movable type–would expect to find first pages like…

Reading LABs (Part 1)

Anne Carson’s Nox         Defining the essentials of artist-bookery is a Sisyphean chore, as everyone who has written anything worth reading about artists’ books readily acknowledges. Book artists employ no standard printing method or machinery. Contributors are not bound by a particular set of materials or building codes. There’s no exact minimum (or maximum, for that matter) degree of involvement demanded of designers in the physical process of creation. Limited edition printings, photocopies, and one of a kinds are all acceptable. The most influential formulation, Johanna Drucker’s,…